RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting September 22
Sep
22
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting September 22

  • University of Toronto Mississauga (map)
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The September 22 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on gravitational waves.

Speaker: Catherine Woodford, University of Toronto, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics

Title: The Discovery of Gravitational Waves

A video of what GW150914 would have looked like if we were close enough to see it

Abstract:

Get an up-close and personal take on the Gravitational Waves discovery that has changed science for the better. Considered the most influential discovery of the century, gravitational wave GW150914 broke records in physics, astronomy, and interferometry - with still more to come. We will talk about what went into the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) that discovered GW150914 from theoretical, engineering, and computer simulation viewpoints, and discuss the outlooks on the future of gravitational wave astronomy.

The detection of gravitational wave GW150914

The detection of gravitational wave GW150914

Bio: I'm a 2nd year PhD candidate in the Physics Department at the University of Toronto and work in the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA). My research falls into two streams: binary black hole simulations and exoplanet simulations. I am a member of the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) collaboration and the Centre for Planetary Sciences (CPS), as well as a planetarium operator for the Dunlap Institute and outreach fanatic. When I'm not thinking or looking at the sky and what lies beyond, I'm volunteering with the Rotaract Club of Toronto, cycling, running, and snowboarding.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting October 27
Oct
27
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting October 27

The October 25 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the Voyager mission to the outer planets.

Talk Title: Voyager at 40

Speaker: Randy Attwood, Mississauga Centre

The two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 - 40 years ago. Over a period of 12 years, they explored the four outer planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The discoveries changed our understanding of our solar system.

This talk will look at the mission and the discoveries as well as some of the challenges Voyager engineers faced in taking late 1960's spacecraft technology - which lasted only a couple years in space - and extended the lifetime to the required 12 years to complete the mission - and beyond. Now the two spacecraft are leaving the solar system and providing information on the heliopause - the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space.

Randy Attwood is the Honorary President of the Mississauga Centre.

Randy Attwood with Voyager at JPL in California

Randy Attwood with Voyager at JPL in California

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main floor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting November 24
Nov
24
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting November 24

The November 24th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the planet Mars.

Speaker: Tanya N. Harrison, Ph.D.  

Director of Research, NewSpace Initiative, Arizona State University

Title: The Past and Present of Water on Mars

From reading article comments online, many people seem to think that scientists are constantly discovering “water on Mars.” This talk summarizes of our current understanding of water in the martian past and present, and the implications of that for the habitability of the Red Planet.

 

Dr. Tanya Harrison is a “Professional Martian” and the Director of Research for the NewSpace Initiative at Arizona State University. She has worked on multiple NASA Mars missions in science and operations, and specializes in the geology of the Red Planet. Tanya holds a Ph.D. in Geology with a Specialization in Planetary Science and Exploration from the University of Western Ontario. 

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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Partial Solar Eclipse August 21
Aug
21
1:00pm 1:00pm

Partial Solar Eclipse August 21

On Monday August 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible in the United States. 

Here in Mississauga, the eclipse will be partial.

Members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will have telescopes set up at The Riverwood Conservancy to observe the eclipse. 

Properly filtered telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Sun. Hand held solar viewers will be handed out as well as information sheets.

NOTE: do not look directly at the Sun without proper protection. Specially designed solar viewers must be used. Do not look at the Sun with sunglasses, smoked glass or photographic films. Safe viewers will be available for use at the Riverwood event. 

The eclipse will start at 1:10 pm. At 2:33 pm it will be maximum eclipse and approximately 75% of the Sun will be covered. The eclipse will end at 3:49 pm.

If the sky is completely overcast, then the observing event will not take place. 

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Astronomy Evening at The Riverwood Conservancy Saturday July 29
Jul
29
8:00pm 8:00pm

Astronomy Evening at The Riverwood Conservancy Saturday July 29

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars.

Saturday July 29 is the first National Star Party. Astronomy clubs across the country are holding a star party tonight to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary since Confederation.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

A short lecture called "The Sky Tonight" will be presented at 8:00. 8:30, 9:00 and 9:30 pm in Chappelle House.  All are welcome. Announcements will be made at the telescope site announcing the talks.  

The International Space Station will be visible low in the north at 9:36

The International Space Station will be visible low in the north at 9:36

 

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planets Jupiter and Saturn and other objects beyond our solar system.  We also expect to see a pass by the International Space Station!

The First Quarter Moon will be visible 

The First Quarter Moon will be visible 

The rings of Saturn are visible when viewed through a telescope.

The rings of Saturn are visible when viewed through a telescope.

Magnificent Jupiter will be visible - we hope to see clouds and the Great Red Spot through telescopes.

Magnificent Jupiter will be visible - we hope to see clouds and the Great Red Spot through telescopes.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the lectures in Chappelle House will still take place. Observing through the telescopes however wold not be possible.

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday June 23
Jun
23
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday June 23

Title: "Life Beyond Earth" 

Speaker: Dr Michael De Robertis, York University

Is there life beyond Earth?  Earth’s fossil records suggest that under the right conditions, simple life can emerge soon after a planet forms.  I will discuss what we mean by the “right conditions” and where these might be found in our own solar system and beyond. 

And what about complex life?  How ubiquitous might intelligent civilizations be among the billions of stars and galaxies in the observable universe?  Some have argued that the evolution of intelligence should be commonplace.  If so, others ask, where are they, why haven't we any evidence for these civilizations?  What might the prevailing silence mean? 

Finally, I will describe strategies used by scientists to search for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence, speculate on whether these will succeed in the near future and what their success might mean for humankind. 

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Directions: Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting May 26
May
26
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting May 26

The May 26th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on planets orbiting Proxima Centuari B.

Talk Title: Exoplanetary Update: Proxima Centauri B

Speaker: Paul Delaney, York University

The first exoplanet was found orbiting a Sun-like star in 1995. In the intervening 20 years, thousands of exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates have been detected suggesting that exoplanets are very common. That of course does not imply the Earth-like planets are common but again, recent statistics suggest that at least one star in 6 contains an Earth-like planet. With the detection of an exoplanet in the Habitable Zone of Proxima Centauri b, speculation and excitement has been aroused about the possibility of exploring that planetary system during the 21st century. Project Starshot even suggests that such a launch maybe only 20 years or so away. This presentation will summarize the state of exoplanetary research and look at the likelihood of exploring the Proxima Centauri star system in the relatively near future.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2074 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Paul Delaney

Paul Delaney

Paul Delaney was born in South Australia and received his Bachelor of Science degree from the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia in 1978 and his Master of Science from the University of Victoria, British Columbia in 1981. Since that time, he has worked as a nuclear physicist for Atomic Energy of Canada and a support astronomer at McGraw Hill Observatory near Tucson, Arizona.

He has been a member of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at York University since 1986. He is a Senior Lecturer teaching a variety of astronomy related courses to science and non-science students. In addition he is the Coordinator of the campus Astronomical Observatory which offers a teaching laboratory environment for science students studying astronomy and extensive Public Outreach access to the community. Between 2002 and 2016 he was the Director of the Division of Natural Science, an academic unit that exposes nearly 12,000 undergraduate students annually to the world of science. He was the Master of Bethune College, one of York’s 8 undergraduate student Colleges, from 1994 until 2005.

He is a passionate educator and delights in discussing the wonders of the universe with people of all ages. Along with his undergraduate Observing Team, he coordinates an extensive Public Outreach program in astronomy including hosting a 1 hour internet radio program ‘YorkUniverse” every Monday evening (on astronomy.fm). He considers himself an amateur as well as professional astronomer and has been interested in astronomy and space science for as long as he can remember. He has been the recipient of York University’s Faculty of Science and Engineering Teaching Award (1991), a ‘top 10’ finalist in TV Ontario’s Best Lecturer competition (2005), a recipient of the University Wide Teaching Award (2006), was the winner of the Royal Canadian Institute’s 2010 Sanford Flemming Medal for outstanding contributions to the public understanding of science amongst Canadians, the 2015 recipient of the Qilak Award from the Canadian Astronomical Society recognizing his ongoing commitment to the public awareness and understanding of astronomy and was awarded in 2016 a University Professorship (essentially lifetime achievement) from York University.

Directions: Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

 

 

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting April 21
Apr
21
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting April 21

The April 21st meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the upcoming August 21 total solar eclipse.

Talk Title: Observing and photographing the August total solar eclipse

Speaker: Randy Attwood, Mississauga Centre Honourary President, Michael Watson , Toronto Centre 

The solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 presents an opportunity for many amateurs to observer their first total solar eclipse.

Total Solar Eclipse, Second Contact / Diamond Ring March 2016 Side, Turkey Photos by Randy Attwood

Total Solar Eclipse, Second Contact / Diamond Ring March 2016 Side, Turkey

Photos by Randy Attwood

These are rare events and may be overwhelming for the novice TSE observer. The presenters have seen several dozen eclipses and will share their experiences with advice to those planning to travel to the centre line.

2016 total solar eclipse. Photo by Randy Attwood

2016 total solar eclipse. Photo by Randy Attwood

The evening will cover all aspects of observing, enjoying, photographing and preparing for the experience which will last a scant two minutes.

Randy Attwood  is currently the Executive Director of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada - Canada's national astronomy organization. He is the founder and Honourary President of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and a Past President of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. In 2013 he was named as one of the first Fellows of the Society. He is currently the publisher of Canada's Astronomy magazine Skynews. 

He is a resident of Mississauga and has been looking up at the night sky for over 40 years. He is the President of The Earthshine Astronomy and Space Science Organization, a Mississauga based not for profit charity organization which runs public science outreach programs in Mississauga.  Randy has appeared on CTV, CBC, GLOBAL and the Discovery Channel to provide background information for space and astronomy related stories.  He has covered 12 space shuttle launches and landings as a journalist and photographer. He has travelled to various places around the world to observe and photograph total eclipses of the sun. He has written High School Astronomy text book units on astronomy and presented planetarium programming at schools.

Asteroid 260235 was renamed Asteroid Attwood in his honour.

Michael Watson is well known in the Society as an astrophotographer.  He is also a veteran eclipse-chaser, having organized or co-lead several eclipse expeditions starting in 1979.  He has seen seven total eclipses, two annular beaded eclipses, and one fully annular eclipse in his 47 years as a member of the RASC.  Michael was on the RASC's National Council for many years, and is the recipient of the Society's Service Award and Simon Newcomb award.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  *** Due to construction we will meet in room SE2074  (just down the hall) ***

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting March 24
Mar
24
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting March 24

The March 24th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on supernovae.

Talk Title: Nature’s Supercolliders: Supernova remnants and how they are connected to our galaxy

Speaker: Jennifer West, David Dunlap Institute

The explosion of a star, or supernova, is one of the most extreme events in the universe, responsible for creating the heavy elements essential  for life. The resulting fast moving shock wave, the supernova remnant, produces super high-energy particles called cosmic rays. Understanding the nature of the magnetic fields is crucial to understanding the extreme processes that produce these cosmic rays. This talk will describe my PhD research, which investigates the magnetic fields of supernova remnants and how they are connected to the magnetic field of our Galaxy.

Jennifer is a Postdoctoral Fellow who uses large radio surveys and radio polarimetry to study magnetic fields in supernova remnants and in the Milky Way Galaxy. She is working with Prof. Bryan Gaensler to analyze data from the upcoming POSSUM (Polarisation Sky Survey of the Universe’s Magnetism) survey using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP).

Jennifer is also enthusiastic about astronomy education and outreach and a long time member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC). She is the recipient of the International Dark Sky Association’s Dark Sky Defender Award (2011) and the RASC’s Ken Chilton Prize (2010) for her contributions to astronomy education and outreach. Jennifer completed her PhD at the University of Manitoba in 2016, working with Dr. Samar Safi-Harb. She joined Dunlap in September 2016.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto, Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.  Directions

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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Royal Canadian Institute meeting on Thursday March 2
Mar
2
7:00pm 7:00pm

Royal Canadian Institute meeting on Thursday March 2

Growing Food in Space @ MISSISSAUGA: Central Library

Mar 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Growing Food in Space

Dr. Michael Dixon, University of Guelph

If humans hope to ever get to Mars or farther, we will need to be able to grow food in space. The space travel environment produces unique challenges to growing food, including microgravity, limited water, artificial light sources and many more. Research at the Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility at the University of Guelph is showing us how to grow food in space and, in the process, is developing beneficial technologies for earth-bound farming.

 

Dr. Mike Dixon is the Director of the Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility and program, and Chair of the Environmental Biology Department, University of Guelph.  Dr. Dixon joined the University in 1985 as an NSERC fellow after earning his PhD from Edinburgh University in Scotland and is now a full professor.

Off campus he is the Technology Exchange Coordinator for the International Advanced Life Support Working Group (IALSWG) which is a strategic planning group offering information and personnel exchange between international space agencies such as NASA, CSA, ESA, RSA and JAXA (Japan).  He also is Chair of the Space Exploration Advisory Committee of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and is a member of the Life Sciences and Technical Committee within the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

As project leader for the Canadian research team investigating the contributions of plants to life support in space, Dr. Dixon formed the Space and Advanced Life Support Agriculture (SALSA) program at the University of Guelph.  This program currently represents Canada’s prime contribution to the International Space program objectives in Life Support.

Dr. Dixon is also the project leader for the research team at Guelph investigating the biofiltration of indoor air as a method of alleviating what is commonly known as “sick building syndrome”.

Toronto Star article - Growing Food in space  

CTV interview - Putting greenhouses in space

The meeting will be held from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. at Central Library in Mississauga. The meeting is open to the public and is free. 

Lecture is in the Noel Ryan Auditorium, Ground Floor, Mississauga Central Library, 301 Burnhamthorpe Road W. Parking under the library is free after 6 p.m. Enter via the ramp accessed from the southbound lane on Duke of York Boulevard between City Centre Drive and Burnhamthorpe Road.

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting February 24, 2017
Feb
24
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting February 24, 2017

The February 24th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the search for Antarctic meteorites

Talk Title: "Hunting meteorites at the End of the World"

Speaker: Dr. Marianne Mader, Royal Ontario Museum

Camping and working in the southernmost, coldest, highest, driest, windiest, least populated continent on Earth is no easy feat! Every year a team of meteorite hunters collects meteorites along the base of the Transantarctic Mountains . How do these explorers survive? What’s so special about these rocks? And why go all the way to Antarctica to find them? Come hear Dr. Marianne Mader, a participant of the 2012-2013 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) Program talk about her experience and then put yourself in her shoes by practicing a little meteorite hunting of your own!

Dr. Marianne Mader strives to enable curiosity and exploration. As the Managing Director for the Centres of Discovery in Earth & Space and Fossils & Evolution at the ROM, she helps people to understand the Earth, our solar system, and how life evolved over time. With over 12 years of field experience, Marianne has studied some of the oldest rocks on Earth in Greenland, explored impact craters across the globe, and most recently collected meteorites in Antarctica. She has collaborated with Western University’s Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, the Canadian Space Agency, NASA, and MDA (Canada’s largest space company) to plan and execute simulated lunar and planetary exploration missions, as well as developing insights into planetary impact cratering processes. Marianne has MScs in both Space Studies and Earth Sciences, and a PhD in planetary science from Western University. She is a Visiting Lecturer at the International Space University.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room. Directions are here.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

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  RASC Mississauga Centre Potpourri Astronomy Evening December 9
Dec
9
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Potpourri Astronomy Evening December 9

The December 9 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature talks on the Apollo 17 mission, the Sky this Month and Planet 9.

Host: Randy Attwood

Ben Feist: Apollo 17

Ben Feist, a local here in Toronto, will outline his research efforts that have culminated in him creating Apollo17.org, a real-time reconstruction of humanity's last mission to the Moon. Ben's talk will coincide with the 44th anniversary of the mission and will detail newly added material that was created in collaboration with NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter team at Goddard Space Flight Centre.

Mohammad Shaban ; Planet Nine

Mohammad will talk about the recent theoretical evidence for the existence of a Planet Nine on the outskirts of our Solar system. He will also relate this to its effects on KBO's and other objects on the solar system and also to the obliquity of our solar system and how planet Nine has been hugely implicated in this respect. 

Randy Attwood: The Sky This Month

Leslie Strike; RASC National Report

Stephen Mallia - Astrophotography Contest update

Jo VandenDool - Announcements

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. 

Potpourri meetings feature a series of short presentations on various astronomy and space topics given by members of the Mississauga Centre. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting November 25
Nov
25
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting November 25

The November 25th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on Space Medicine.

Talk Title: Space Medicine

Speaker: Dr. Dave Dev

When looking at happy & floating astronauts aboard the ISS, all may look calm, but it is certainly not.  Come and hear about the myriad hazards to the body in near earth orbit.  Our talk will focus on various disease states from space travel, and the clever ways space medicine tries to mitigate the risks.  After the talk, you will think twice about taking a ride 200 km straight up.

Space Medicine on Skylab

Space Medicine on Skylab

Bio:  Under daylight, Dr. Dave Dev is a mild mannered physician in the Toronto area.  U of T is Dave"s alma mater, and he's delighted to come back to familiar hallways for this presentation.   For the first time, Dave will not fear being confused in a lecture room.  It's finally his turn to confuse others.  His curiosity in space medicine began in undergraduate anatomy when he asked, "what would happen to a body in space ?"  The answers were odd and unexpected, and will be discussed at the talk.

David Dev

David Dev

Under starlight, Dave's other passion emerges ; the pursuit of astrophotography.  Dave is an active member in many astronomy clubs, and is also the Director of the Astrophotography competition at Starfest.   

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting October 28
Oct
28
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting October 28

The October 28th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the status of amateur astronomy.

Talk Title: Amateur Astronomy - A Status Report

Speaker: Randy Attwood, Executive Director - The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada  

 

Amateur astronomy has changed drastically over the past 50 years. Telescopes made in the basement have been replaced with high quality instruments capable of performing astronomical research. Those new to astronomy are confronted with computerized telescopes and unfortunately, disappearing skies due to light pollution

 

There is a great opportunity for amateur astronomers to reach members of the public and promote science literacy and critical thinking. Since young people are attracted to astronomy and space science, we have an opportunity to encourage young people to embrace “STEAM” and pursue careers in science and technology.

Randy Attwood stands in front of the telescope/camera used to discover Pluto in 1930.

Randy Attwood stands in front of the telescope/camera used to discover Pluto in 1930.

 Randy Attwood has been looking up for most of his life. His interest in space and astronomy was sparked during the summer of 1969 with the first moon landing. Since then he has observed and photographed the night sky, chased solar eclipses across the globe and witnessed several space shuttle and rocket launches. He often appears in the media to comment on various astronomy and space exploration stories. To recognize his contributions to science public outreach, asteroid 265235 was named Asteroid Attwood in 2012.


 

 

 

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting September 23
Sep
23
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting September 23

  • University of Toronto Mississauga (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The September 23rd meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the OSIRIS-Rex mission.

Talk Title:  There and Back Again

Speaker:  Julie Tomé 

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is on its way to asteroid Bennu on a sample return mission. What questions are mission scientists hoping to answer? Who gets to play with the space dirt? Why was Bennu chosen? Will we need Bruce Willis to blow it up? Learn the answers to these questions and more!

Julie Tomé has earned a Hon. BSc in Physics & Astronomy from York University (’03), a BEd from the University of Ottawa (‘04), and a graduate diploma in Science Communication from Laurentian University (’07). As a Museum Teacher at the Royal Ontario Museum, Julie shares her passion for all things science and history with young and old through school programs, camps, exhibitions, and special programs. 

Julie Tomé

Julie Tomé

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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  Astronomy Evening at Riverwood September 13
Sep
13
8:00pm 8:00pm

Astronomy Evening at Riverwood September 13

WE ARE GO FOR TONIGHT - TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 13 at 8:00 PM

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planets Mars and Saturn and other objects beyond our solar system.   

59712main_image_feature_179_hstfull.jpg

Look for meteors, artificial satellites and anything else in the skies over Mississauga.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 13th.

 

 

 

 

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  Astronomy Evening at Riverwood August 10
Aug
10
8:30pm 8:30pm

Astronomy Evening at Riverwood August 10

With the forecast looking clear tonight we are GO for observing at Riverwood at 8:30 pm Wednesday August 10.

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

Park in the main parking lot. You will be directed by volunteers to the observing area.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planets Mars and Saturn and other objects beyond our solar system.  We expect to see a pass by the International Space Station just after 10:00 pm.

In early June, Mars was at its closest to Earth since 2005.

MARS AS SEEN BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

MARS AS SEEN BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

TELESCOPES WILL BE SET UP FOR VISITORS TO LOOK THROUGH

TELESCOPES WILL BE SET UP FOR VISITORS TO LOOK THROUGH

SATURN AND ITS BEAUTIFUL RING SYSTEM

SATURN AND ITS BEAUTIFUL RING SYSTEM

The International Space Station will make a brief appearance at 9:10 tonight passing low in the north.

The International Space Station will make a brief appearance at 9:10 tonight passing low in the north.

THE MOON will be  in the First Quarter phase on August 10.

THE MOON will be  in the First Quarter phase on August 10.

Look for meteors, artificial satellites and anything else in the skies over Mississauga.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 9th.

Directions to the Riverwood Conservancy.

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Jul
12
9:00pm 9:00pm

Astronomy Evening at Riverwood July 12

Weather looks good for Tuesday July 12 at 9 pm - we are GO!

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

Park in the main parking lot. You will be directed by volunteers to the observing area.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planets Jupiter, Mars and Saturn and other objects beyond our solar system.  

In early June, Mars was at its closest to Earth since 2005.

MARS AS SEEN BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

MARS AS SEEN BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

TELESCOPES WILL BE SET UP FOR VISITORS TO LOOK THROUGH

TELESCOPES WILL BE SET UP FOR VISITORS TO LOOK THROUGH

SATURN AND ITS BEAUTIFUL RING SYSTEM

SATURN AND ITS BEAUTIFUL RING SYSTEM

CLOUDS MAKE JUPITER A COLOURFUL PLANET.

CLOUDS MAKE JUPITER A COLOURFUL PLANET.

THE MOON THIS WEEK WILL BE IN A WAXING GIBBOUS PHASE.

THE MOON THIS WEEK WILL BE IN A WAXING GIBBOUS PHASE.

Look for meteors, artificial satellites and anything else in the skies over Mississauga.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 12th.

Directions to the Riverwood Conservancy.

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday, June 24
Jun
24
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday, June 24

The June 24 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on Galaxies

Talk Title: Two Galaxies to rule them all

Speaker: George Conidis, PhD Candidate in Physics & Astronomy, York University

Our observable Universe hosts hundreds of billions of galaxies distributed unevenly in a sponge-like configuration known as the Cosmic Web. The web can be classified into four distinct groups: voids (empty regions with no/few galaxies), walls/sheets, filaments, and nodes/clusters. These structures are seeded to grow from physical processes at the earliest times in the Universe. Thus, internal to each void, sheet, filament, and node, there is embedded information about how the adolescent Universe behaved. One of the primordial signatures embedded in large scale structure is the organization of a member galaxy's orientation to their host Cosmic Web structure. Our host galaxy, the Milky Way, lives in a sheet of galaxies known as the Local Sheet. As it turns out, the Milky Way and its companion the Andromeda galaxy are the peculiar culprits behind bullying their neighbours into misalignment with the sheet and theoretical predictions.

George Conidis  (Courtesy Toronto Star)

George Conidis  (Courtesy Toronto Star)

George Conidis was recently presented with the Mitacs Award for Outstanding Innovation for research that includes discovering 174 galactic neighbourhoods that mirror our own:

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/11/24/toronto-innovation-award-winner-talks-galaxies-existentialism-and-life-on-mars.html

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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  Astronomy Evening at Riverwood June 14
Jun
14
9:00pm 9:00pm

Astronomy Evening at Riverwood June 14

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planets Jupiter, Mars and Saturn and other objects beyond our solar system.  We also expect to see a pass by the International Space Station!

In early June, Mars was at its closest to Earth since 2005.

Mars as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope  

Mars as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope

 

Telescopes will be set up for visitors to look through

Telescopes will be set up for visitors to look through

Saturn and its beautiful ring system

Saturn and its beautiful ring system

Clouds make Jupiter a colourful planet.

Clouds make Jupiter a colourful planet.

The Moon this week will be in a waxing gibbous phase.

The Moon this week will be in a waxing gibbous phase.

Look for meteors, artificial satellites and anything else in the skies over Mississauga.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 14th.

Directions to the Riverwood Conservancy.

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday May 27, 2016
May
27
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday May 27, 2016

The May 27 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on antimatter.

Talk Title:  Antimatter: from the subatomic to the cosmological scales

Speaker:  Dr. Wendy Taylor,  York University Physics & Astronomy

Dr. Wendy Taylor talks about the science of antimatter. What is it? How is it made, trapped, studied and used? And what can it tell us about how the universe works?

Dr Wendy Taylor, York University

Dr Wendy Taylor, York University

Wendy J. Taylor is Professor of Physics at York University and former Canada Research Chair in Experimental Particle Physics. She is a member of the university’s High Energy Physics Group and leads its ATLAS group.  ATLAS is a key experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN where the Higgs Boson particle was discovered in 2012. Her current research focuses on the search for the hypothetical magnetic monopole particle. Her former research at the Fermilab Tevatron particle collider showed differences in the production of matter and anti-matter in high-energy collisions shedding light on the imbalance in matter and anti-matter in the early universe. Professor Taylor is a member of the American Physical Society and the Canadian Institute of Particle Physics.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

 

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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Astronomy Evening at Riverwood Tuesday, May 17
May
17
9:00pm 9:00pm

Astronomy Evening at Riverwood Tuesday, May 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weather looks good for Tuesday night - see you at 9:00 pm. Dress warmly.

Come out and observe the universe at The Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars. 

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

Telescopes set up at Riverwood to look at the Moon.

Telescopes set up at Riverwood to look at the Moon.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the planet Jupiter and other objects beyond our solar system.   

Jupiter as seen through a telescope. Photo by Dan Doolan

Jupiter as seen through a telescope. Photo by Dan Doolan

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 17th.

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Observe the Transit of Mercury at the Riverwood Conservancy
May
9
9:00am 9:00am

Observe the Transit of Mercury at the Riverwood Conservancy

Come out and observe a rare event - a transit of Mercury.

A transit of Mercury - the planet can be seen slowly moving across the face of the Sun.

A transit of Mercury - the planet can be seen slowly moving across the face of the Sun.

Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the transit.

Telescopes equipped with special filters will provide a safe view of the transit. The transit takes approximately 7.5 hours for the planet Mercury to cross the Sun. Maximum transit is at 11 am. 

The transit will begin just after 7:15 am EDT and ends at 2:40 pm EDT. Maximum transit occurs just before 11 am EDT.

In 2004 and 2012, the planet Venus crossed the Sun in two rare transits. (See below)

A transit of Venus took place in June 2004 and June 2012.

A transit of Venus took place in June 2004 and June 2012.

Observing will take place by the large parking lot near the Barn, Visual Arts Mississauga and the MacEwan Terrace Garden. The event starts at 9 am, is free and open to everyone.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be cancelled.

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday April 29, 2016
Apr
29
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday April 29, 2016

The April 29 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on small bodies in the solar system.

Talk Title:  Good Things Come in Small Packages

Speaker:  Rachel Ward-Maxwell, Ph.D.   Ontario Science Centre

Meteroids, asteroids, comets and dwarf planets are some of the smallest bodies in our solar system and are the focus of several recent space missions: Rosetta, Dawn, and New Horizons. Learn about how Pluto, Ceres and these other tiny wonders continue to amaze and surprise us.

Asteroids Vesta, Eros and Ceres

Asteroids Vesta, Eros and Ceres

Rachel Ward-Maxwell received her PhD in astrophysics from McMaster University in 2015, where she used computer simulations to model the structure of interstellar clouds and formation of Sun-like stars. As the Researcher-Programmer in Astronomy and Space Sciences at the Ontario Science Centre, Dr. Ward-Maxwell develops astronomy program offerings, including planetarium shows, and supports the Research Live! program, an initiative where visitors participate in current active research studies conducted by visiting scientists. She is passionate about communicating science with the general public and is a strong advocate for women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) disciplines.

During her academic career, Dr. Ward-Maxwell developed content and organized free science programming for children and youth across Hamilton and surrounding communities. Her experience in education and public outreach also includes time spent over the past ten years as a science communicator and program developer for a variety of organizations.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday April 1, 2016
Apr
1
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday April 1, 2016

The April 1 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on engineering tiny space satellites.

Talk Title:   Engineering Tiny Space Telescopes

Speaker:  Cordell Grant   University of Toronto Space Flight Laboratory (UTIAS-SFL)

Launched in 2013 and 2014 and billed by Popular Science as one of the “Most Incredible Telescopes in Existence”, the six nanosatellites of the BRITE-Constellation mission are believed to be not only the world’s smallest space telescopes, but also the first satellite constellation dedicated to astronomy. Using 3cm-aperture refractive optics, BRITE is currently performing a two-colour photometric survey of the brightest stars in the Earth’s sky. Typically massive and short-lived, these luminous stars dominate the ecology of the Universe and have seeded the interstellar medium with elements critical for the formation of planetary systems and organic life.  

Surprisingly, in the push to observe ever fainter objects, bright stars have been rather poorly studied. Reversing that trend, BRITE-Constellation is now measuring brightness variations at the milli-magnitude level, a precision at least 10 times better than what is currently achievable from ground-based observations. Mr. Grant will discuss the unique challenges associated with designing, building and testing not just space telescopes but tiny space telescopes. He will also provide a unique glimpse into the world of “rocket science” by providing insight into the design of the spacecraft that support, power and point those telescopes through launch and in orbit.

BRITE-CA-CanX4&5-AISSat-2-EV9-with-team-mediumres_1.gif

Cordell Grant is the Manager of Satellite Systems at the University of Toronto Space Flight Laboratory (UTIAS-SFL) and was project manager, systems engineer, opto-mechanical engineer and assembly/integration lead for the BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) Constellation of nanosatellites. Born and raised just outside of Sydney, Nova Scotia (where the skies were far darker than in Toronto) Cordell has always held a fascination with the night sky and the exploration of it, a passion which led him to pursue Aerospace Engineering as a career. He holds Bachelor’s degrees in both mathematics (Cape Breton University) and mechanical engineering (Dalhousie). In 2005 he completed a Masters of Applied Science degree from UTIAS-SFL where his thesis focused on the mechanical and thermal design of the CanX-2 nanosatellite. Cordell would go on to lead the development of that spacecraft, which launched in 2008 and was awarded the CASI Allouette Award in 2010. Cordell enjoys public outreach and has given talks on Space and Spacecraft Engineering to groups aged 10 to 80+. Cordell currently spends most of his time designing and building spacecraft and space telescopes that look down, at Earth, instead of up.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting February 26
Feb
26
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting February 26

  • University of Toronto at Mississauga (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The February 26th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on the creation of elements inside stars.…

Talk Title:  Synthesis of Elements in Stars

Speaker: James Edgar, President, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

All stars are born from hydrogen and during their lives they produce elements through nuclear fusion. High-mass stars end their lives as supernovae, perhaps the most cataclysmic events in the universe, producing the heavy elements.

Courtesy Wikipedia

Courtesy Wikipedia

This talk merges James Edgar’s love of woodworking, astronomy, genealogy, chemistry, physics, and poetry from Northern Ireland, although the main thrust of the presentation is about how elements form within stars.

RASC President James Edgar

RASC President James Edgar

James Edgar’s interest in astronomy began in the early 1970s when he and his family went into the dark of night to see Comet Kohoutek. Unfortunately, it didn’t present itself at naked-eye brightness. James started by volunteering with the Vancouver Museum, going into schools, talking to children about the Sun and the stars. In 1999, he bought his first telescope. One year later, his son bought him a membership in The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC) and, as they say, the rest is history. James has attended every General Assembly of the Society since 2001. He is now National President of the RASC, production manager of the Society’s bi-monthly Journal, and is excited to be the next editor of the RASC Observer’s Handbook.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

 

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting April 1
Jan
1
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting April 1

The April 1 meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on space medicine.

Talk Title: Space Medicine 101

Speaker: Dr. David Dev

Remote ultrasound procedures help provide for medical diagnoses on the International Space Station.   Photo courtesy NASA Spinoff

Remote ultrasound procedures help provide for medical diagnoses on the International Space Station.   Photo courtesy NASA Spinoff

Description : All may seem calm on the ISS, but its not.  Microgravity alters human pathology and physiology in bizarre ways, and some effects are permanent.  Learn about the disorders and the countermeasures to prevent them.  You might just cross Space Tourism off your bucket list forever !

Dave Dev is an MD and family practitioner for over 35 years. He is an amateur astronomer and keen astroimager.  For the past three years, he has been the Director of the Starfest Imaging Competition. His astroimage web site is here.

Dr Joe Kerwin examines fellow astronaut Pete Conrad on Skylab in 1973.

Dr Joe Kerwin examines fellow astronaut Pete Conrad on Skylab in 1973.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

 

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

 

 

 

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday November 27
Nov
27
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting Friday November 27

  • University of Toronto at Misissauga (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The November 27th meeting of the RASC Mississauga Centre will feature a talk on Canada's involvement in the development and use of new large telescopes.

Title:                  Canada’s engagement in the new “World Observatories”

Speaker:           Dr Ernie Seaquist, University of Toronto

In recent years Canada has become part of the international club participating in a series of what we might call “World Observatories”. These are astronomy facilities which are unique, or nearly so, and which are sufficiently costly ($1B or more) that they are affordable only by relatively large international consortia.

THe 30 metre telescope

THe 30 metre telescope

Examples are the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and the forthcoming facilities: the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Canada is participating at some level in all of these. 


I will discuss the impact of these projects on Canadian astronomy and on our understanding of the universe and its origins. I will also touch on the economic benefits and the politics, both national and international, underlying the achievement of membership in such partnerships. Of particular interest is whether engagement in such large projects leaves any room for smaller and less expensive national initiatives. Another important topic is the role of the RASC in this new era, and an examination of the mutual benefits of the current initiatives to both professional and amateur astronomers.


Ernie is Professor Emeritus at the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto. Until his retirement in 2004 his field of research was radio astronomy with emphasis on star formation in starburst galaxies and radio emission from active stars. He was Chair of the Department and Director of the David Dunlap Observatory between 1988 and 1999. Since retirement he has been involved various aspects of Canada’s engagement in the TMT and the SKA. He is currently Executive Director of the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA), the organization responsible for spearheading the successful effort to get funding for Canada’s role in TMT. He is also a member of the Board of Governors of the TMT International Observatory (TIO) which owns the TMT and will oversee the construction and ultimately its operation.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

 

ALMA_potw_eso_130116.jpg

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of the
Davis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs until
you reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,
follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the main
floor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.


Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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Astronomy Evening at The Riverwood Conservancy Tuesday November 17.
Nov
17
7:00pm 7:00pm

Astronomy Evening at The Riverwood Conservancy Tuesday November 17.

Come out and observe the universe at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon, planets and stars. 

The Moon will be visible at Riverwood this week.

The Moon will be visible at Riverwood this week.

Weather permitting, members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up telescopes to show members of the public spectacular views of the Universe. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House.  The event starts at dusk is free and open to everyone.

The Pleiades star cluster will be visible.

The Pleiades star cluster will be visible.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon, the Peiades star cluster  and other objects beyond our solar system.   

Look for meteors, artificial satellites and anything else in the skies over Mississauga.

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the observing will be delayed one day. Check this web site for GO/NO GO information on the afternoon of the 18th.

Directions to Riverwood are here.

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Riding the Tide on Black Holes
Nov
5
7:30pm 7:30pm

Riding the Tide on Black Holes

Royal Canadian Institute Meeting in Mississauga

Eric Poisson, BSc, MSc, Ph.D, Department of Physics, University of Guelph

General relativity, Einstein’s greatest scientific achievement is turning 100 this year.   The speaker will describe how a companion body can raise a tide on a black hole, much as the Moon raises a tide on Earth and what consequences this can have on the motion of the two-body system.

Eric Poisson is an award-winning physicist specializing in black holes and gravitational waves. In 2006, he won the Canadian Association of Physics Herzberg Medal for outstanding achievement by a physicist aged 40 or less.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada — Mississauga Centre

 

Parking under the library is free after 6 p.m. Enter via the ramp accessed from the southbound lane on Duke of York Boulevard between City Centre Drive and Burnhamthorpe Road.

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Ice in the Solar System from Mercury to Pluto
Nov
3
8:00pm 8:00pm

Ice in the Solar System from Mercury to Pluto

"Ice in the Solar System from Mercury to Pluto"

by David Paige, Dept. of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, UCLA

David Paige is Professor of Planetary Sciences at UCLA. He is a Principal Investigator on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission, and also on NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft, which discovered ice on the Moon and on Mercury.

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RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting
Oct
30
8:00pm 8:00pm

RASC Mississauga Centre Meeting

The October 30 meeting of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will focus on the planet Pluto.

Speaker: Professor Paul Delaney, York University

Title: Dwarf Planet Revealed: New Horizons at Pluto

The search for Pluto started in 1781 with the confirmed observation of Uranus.

It took until 1930 for an astronomer to find the "9th planet."  Little did Clyde Tombaugh know the excitement his discovery would generate in the 21st century.  However, the secrets of the last of the "classical planets" would not be revealed until the fly by of the New Horizons spacecraft in July 2015.  This lecture will summarize the history of Pluto and the results sent back to date from New Horizons.  The revelations are unexpected!

Professor Paul Delaney

Professor Paul Delaney

Paul Delaney is a senior lecturer and professor of physics and astronomy at York University in Toronto. He is also the director of the Division of Natural Science within the Faculty of Science at York, as well as the Master of Bethune College at York.

Delaney has his Master's degree in science. He has taught at York University since 1986. He earned his Bachelors in Science in Experimental Physics at the Australian National University in Canberra and his Master's degree in astronomy at the University of Victoria. Delaney has been the recipient of many faculty of science and engineering awards at York University. One of his classes deals with the possibility of life on Mars. Delaney is also the director of the observatory at the York University, and its outreach program. In the past, he has also worked as a nuclear physicist at the Atomic Energy of Canada, and a support astronomer with the McGraw-Hill Observatory in TucsonArizona.

He holds both Australian and Canadian citizenship, and resides in Simcoe County with his wife - whom he met while attending the University of Victoria - and their two sons.

The meeting will be held from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. at The University of Toronto,Mississauga Campus, in lecture hall SE2082 in the William Davis Building. The meeting is open to the public and is free.  

Enter off of Mississauga Road. Park in lot 4 or the parkade, across from the fitness centre south of theDavis Building. Enter through the Fitness centre, walk up the stairs untilyou reach the main corridor then turn right. (If you need an elevator,follow the corridor to the right of the stairs, then go up to the mainfloor.) Look for the Mississauga Centre sign in front of the lecture room.

Post meeting plans: we usually continue the discussion post-meeting at a local bar – please join us!

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Observe a Total Lunar Eclipse
Sep
27
to Sep 28

Observe a Total Lunar Eclipse

  • The Riverwood Conservancy (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join members of the RASC and observe a total eclipse of the Moon on Sunday September 27. The event will start just past 9 pm and last 3 hours.

The various phases of a total lunar eclipse - photo by Fred Espenak

The various phases of a total lunar eclipse - photo by Fred Espenak

Come out and observe a rare total eclipse of the Moon at the Riverwood Conservancy! Join members of the Mississauga Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada as they set up large telescopes to look at the Moon. Observing will take place on the green in front of Chappelle House. The event starts at 8:30 and is free and open to everyone.

Large telescopes will be set up and pointed at the Moon as it moves into the Earth's shadow.

 

The partial phases of the eclipse begin just after 9 pm.

For about an hour, the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. At 10:11, the Moon will be totally eclipsed. It may take on a dusty orange colour. Total eclipse lasts until 11:23 when the Moon begins to leave the shadow. 

Bring a chair and blanket, some refreshments, binoculars and enjoy the event!

Members of the RASC will be on hand to explain the various phases.

Although the eclipse lasts past midnight, the main phases through totality are the parts not to miss - up to just after 11 pm.

The Moon moves into the Earth's shadow during an eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

The Moon moves into the Earth's shadow during an eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

The Moon moves out of the Earth's shadow during an eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

The Moon moves out of the Earth's shadow during an eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

Note: If the weather is cloudy, the eclipse will not be visible. We will send out a GO/NO GO announcement the day of the eclipse.

The Moon during total eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

The Moon during total eclipse in 2010. Photo by Randy Attwood

Observing will take place on the Chappelle lawn. Here are directions to Riverwood.

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